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eziobartocci
Ezio Bartocci is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Informatics, Cyber-Physical Systems Group at the Vienna University of Technology. The primary focus of his research is to develop formal and computational methods, tools and techniques which support the modeling and automated analysis of complex computational systems, including software systems, embedded systems and biological systems.

Previously he was a post-doctoral researcher at the Department of Computer Science (Research Scientist – from March 2011) and at the Department of Applied Math and Statistics (Research Associate – from February 2010) of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, working with Prof. James Glimm, Prof. Radu Grosu and Prof. Scott. A. Smolka. His research area, in the framework of the NSF Expeditions in Computing project CMACS, was the Computational Modelling and Analysis of Cardiac Dynamics for Prediction and Control of Cardiac Arrhythmia. He received the B.S. degree in Computer Science and the M.S. degree in Bioinformatics from the University of Camerino in Italy, in 2002 and 2005, respectively. During my M.S. degree in Bioinformatics he won a scholarship (from June 2003 to Feb 2004) funded by the MIUR project Oncology Over Internet (O2I). In 2009 he got a Ph.D. in Information Science and Complex Systems from the University of Camerino, under the supervision of Prof. Flavio Corradini. In 2014 he earned the National Italian Habilitation as Associate Professor in Computer Science by the Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research.

He also co-chaired several international events, such as HSB 2012, the First International Workshop on Hybrid Systems and Biology, SPIN 2013, the 20th Intern. Symposium on Model Checking Software, the CSRV-2014, the First Intl. Competition of Software Runtime Verification in Canada, the Medical CPS track at Isola 2014 and in 2015 he will co-chair in Vienna the 15th Intl. Conference on Runtime Verification.

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radu
Radu Grosu is a Full Professor, and the Head of the Institute of Computer Engineering, at the Faculty of Informatics, of the Vienna University of Technology.
Grosu is also the Head of the Cyber-Physical-Systems Group within the Institute of Computer-Engineering, and a Research Professor at the Department of Computer Science, of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA.
The research interests of Radu Grosu include the modeling, the analysis and the control of cyber-physical systems and of biological systems.

The applications focus of Radu Grosu includes distributed automotive and avionic systems, autonomous mobility, green operating systems, mobile ad-hoc networks, cardiac-cell networks, and genetic regulatory networks.
Radu Grosu is the recipient of the National Science Foundation Career Award, the State University of New York Research Foundation Promising Inventor Award, the Association for Computing Machinery Service Award, and is an elected member of the International Federation for Information Processing, Working Group 2.2.
Before receiving his appointment at the Vienna University of Technology, Radu Grosu was an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he co- directed the Concurrent-Systems Laboratory and co-founded the Systems-Biology Laboratory.

Radu Grosu earned his doctorate (Dr.rer.nat.) in Computer Science from the Faculty of Informatics of the Technical University München, Germany. He was subsequently a Research Associate in the Department of Computer and Information Science, of the University of Pennsylvania, USA, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science, of the State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA.

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MS_farbe
Martina Seidl is an Assistant Professor at the Institute for Formal Models
and Verification at the Johannes Kepler University Linz. Further, she
is research associate of the Business Informatics Group at the Vienna
University of Technology, from which she also received her PhD in 2007.
Her research interests include various aspects of automated reasoning
and verification techniques based on SAT and QBF as well as topics of
model-based development like the evolution of software models.
She is co-organizer of the TAP 2014 conference, the QBF 2014 workshop,
as well as the QBF Gallery 2014, the competition for QBF solvers.

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ana
Ana Sokolova is an Assistant Professor (tenure track) at the Department of Computer Sciences, University of Salzburg. Her research deals with concurrency, (relaxations of) semantics of concurrent objects, probabilistic systems, and coalgebras. She holds an MSc from the St.Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia, and PhD from Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands. Before her current position, she was a postdoctoral researcher with Prof. Bart Jacobs at the Radboud University Nijmegen, a postdoctoral researcher with Prof. Christoph Kirsch at the University of Salzburg, and an Elise Richter Research Fellow.

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georg
Georg Weissenbacher is currently a tenure-track assistant professor in the Formal Methods group at the Institute for Information Systems of Vienna University of Technology. He is leading a WWTF-funded Vienna Research Group for Young Investigators.
Until recently, Georg worked as a postdoctoral research associate in Prof Sharad Malik’s group at the department of electrical engineering of Princeton University.
He received a Diploma from Graz University of Technology in Austria, started my doctoral studies at ETH Zurich (Switzerland) and completed my DPhil in computer science at the University of Oxford in 2010 (under the supervision of Dr Daniel Kröning). His dissertation is concerned with the automated verification of software. His doctoral studies were generously supported through a Microsoft European PhD scholarship.
While pursuing my degree, Georg gained practical experience working as a software developer at the Austrian companies Joanneum Research and HS-Art. He interned at the Danish company IFAD, and at Microsoft Research Redmond (WA) and Cambridge (UK). After his undergraduate studies, Georg spent one year at the Austrian Research Centers in Vienna as a software engineer.
His research interests are automated formal verification techniques, static analysis, and decision procedures. He is the co-author of over a dozen peer reviewed papers on these topics.
Georg enjoys teaching and assists courses since his undergraduate studies. He has recently taught a course on formal verification at Princeton University. He also co-authored a textbook on digital circuit design.
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zuleger
Florian Zuleger is an assistant professor at the Technical University of Vienna, where he obtained his PhD under the supervision of Helmut Veith. He is interested in static and dynamic approaches to program analysis and in applying automata theory and logic to verification. His current research focuses on termination and bound analysis, shape analysis, and automated grading for online courses.

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