Johannes Kloos

TBA

Dana Drachsler-Cohen

Miriam García

Jean-Pierre Talpin

Abstract:

We consider distributed timed systems that implement leader election
protocols which are at the heart of clock synchronization protocols. We
develop abstraction techniques for parameterized model checking of such
protocols under arbitrary network topologies, where nodes have independently
evolving clocks. We apply our technique for model checking the root election
part of the flooding time synchronisation protocol (FTSP), and obtain
improved results compared to previous work. We model check the protocol for
all topologies in which the distance to the node to be elected leader is
bounded by a given parameter.

Veselin Raychev

Zvonimir Rakamaric

Abstract:
Tool prototyping is an essential step in developing novel software verification algorithms and techniques. However, implementing a verifier prototype that can handle real-world programs is a huge endeavor, which hinders researchers by forcing them to spend more time engineering tools, and less time innovating. In this talk, I will present the SMACK software verification toolchain. The toolchain provides a modular and extensible software verification ecosystem that decouples the front-end source language details from back-end verification algorithms. It achieves that by translating from the LLVM compiler intermediate representation into the Boogie intermediate verification language. SMACK benefits the software verification community in several ways: (i) it can be used as an off-the-shelf software verifier in an applied software verification project, (ii) it enables researchers to rapidly develop and release new verification algorithms, (iii) it allows for adding support for new languages in its front-end. We have used SMACK to verify numerous C/C++ programs, including industry examples, showing it is mature and competitive. Likewise, SMACK is already being used in several existing verification research prototypes.

František Blahoudek

The talk will have three parts in which I will discuss the results achieved with my colleagues about nondeterministic, deterministic, and semi-deterministic omega-automata. For nondeterministic automata, I will show which aspects of property automata can influence the performance of explicit model checking and what improvements can be made in LTL-to-automata traslation if we have some knowledge about the verified system. Then I will present our efficient translation of a fragment of LTL to deterministic automata. Finally, I will explore the jungle of Buchi automata classes that lie between deterministic and nondeterministic automata. I will present how to efficiently complement semi-deterministic automata and how to obtain them from nondeterministic generalized Buchi automata.

Andrei Voronkov

Abstract:

It is known that one can extract Craig interpolants from so-called local derivations. An interpolant extracted from such a derivation is a boolean combination of formulas occurring in the derivation. However, standard complete proof systems, such as superposition, for theories having the interpolation property are not necessarily complete for local proofs.
In this paper we investigate interpolant extraction from non-local proofs in the superposition calculus and prove a number of general results about interpolant extraction and complexity of extracted interpolants. In particular, we prove that the number of quantifier alternations in first-order interpolants of formulas without quantifier alternations is unbounded. This result has far-reaching consequences for using local proofs as a foundation for interpolating proof systems – any such proof system should deal with formulas of arbitrary quantifier complexity.
To search for alternatives for interpolating proof systems, we consider several variations on interpolation and local proofs. Namely, we give an algorithm for building interpolants from resolution refutations in logic without equality and discuss additional constraints when this approach can be also used for logic with equality. We finally propose a new direction related to interpolation via local proofs in first-order theories.

Karel Horák

Every day, we make sequences of decisions to accomplish our goals, and we attempt to achieve these goals in the most favorable way. In many aspects of life, such as in security or economy, the optimality of these decisions is critical, and a computational support for decision making is thus needed. Sequential decision making is, however, computationally challenging in the presence of uncertainty (partially observable Markov decision processes) or even adversaries (partially observable stochastic games). We provide a game theoretic model of one-sided partially observable stochastic games which is motivated by problems arising mainly in security. It captures both the uncertainty of the decision maker and the adversarial nature of the problem into account. Our framework assumes two players where one player is given the advantage of having perfect information. We show that we can solve such games in the similar fashion as one solves POMDPs using the value iteration algorithm, including its more practical approximate variants based on point-based updates of the value function.

Wojciech Czerwiński

Languages K and L are separable by language S if K is included in S and L is disjoint from S.
I will present recent results on decidability of the problem whether two languages of one counter automata are separable
by some regular language.