Johannes Kloos

TBA

Dana Drachsler-Cohen

Miriam García

Veselin Raychev

František Blahoudek

The talk will have three parts in which I will discuss the results achieved with my colleagues about nondeterministic, deterministic, and semi-deterministic omega-automata. For nondeterministic automata, I will show which aspects of property automata can influence the performance of explicit model checking and what improvements can be made in LTL-to-automata traslation if we have some knowledge about the verified system. Then I will present our efficient translation of a fragment of LTL to deterministic automata. Finally, I will explore the jungle of Buchi automata classes that lie between deterministic and nondeterministic automata. I will present how to efficiently complement semi-deterministic automata and how to obtain them from nondeterministic generalized Buchi automata.

Karel Horák

Every day, we make sequences of decisions to accomplish our goals, and we attempt to achieve these goals in the most favorable way. In many aspects of life, such as in security or economy, the optimality of these decisions is critical, and a computational support for decision making is thus needed. Sequential decision making is, however, computationally challenging in the presence of uncertainty (partially observable Markov decision processes) or even adversaries (partially observable stochastic games). We provide a game theoretic model of one-sided partially observable stochastic games which is motivated by problems arising mainly in security. It captures both the uncertainty of the decision maker and the adversarial nature of the problem into account. Our framework assumes two players where one player is given the advantage of having perfect information. We show that we can solve such games in the similar fashion as one solves POMDPs using the value iteration algorithm, including its more practical approximate variants based on point-based updates of the value function.

Wojciech Czerwiński

Languages K and L are separable by language S if K is included in S and L is disjoint from S.
I will present recent results on decidability of the problem whether two languages of one counter automata are separable
by some regular language.

Zvonimir Rakamarić

Virtually all real-valued computations are carried out using floating-point data types and operations. With the current emphasis of system development often being on computational efficiency, developers as well as compilers are increasingly attempting to optimize floating-point routines. Reasoning about the correctness of these optimizations is complicated, and requires error analysis procedures with different characteristics and trade-offs. In my talk, I will motivate the need for such analyses. Then, I will present both a dynamic and a rigorous static analysis we developed for estimating errors of floating-point routines. Finally, I will describe how we extended our rigorous static analysis into a procedure for mixed-precision tuning of floating-point routines.
Short bio:
Zvonimir Rakamaric is an assistant professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah. Prior to this, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Carnegie Mellon University in Silicon Valley, where he worked closely with researchers from the Robust Software Engineering Group at NASA Ames Research Center to improve the coverage of testing of NASA’s flight critical systems. Zvonimir received his bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Zagreb, Croatia; he obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from the Department of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia, Canada.
Zvonimir‘s research mission is to improve the reliability and resilience of complex software systems by empowering developers with practical tools and techniques for analysis of their artifacts. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award 2016, Microsoft Research Software Engineering Innovation Foundation (SEIF) Award 2012, Microsoft Research Graduate Fellowship 2008-2010, Silver Medal in the ACM Student Research Competition at the 32nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE) 2010, and the Outstanding Student Paper Award at the 13th International Conference on Tools and Algorithms for the Construction and Analysis of Systems (TACAS) 2007.
For more information about Zvonimir, visit www.zvonimir.info.

Joost-Pieter Katoen

Probabilistic programming is en vogue. It is used to describe
complex Bayesian networks, quantum programs, security protocols and
biological systems. Programming languages like C, C#, Java, Prolog,
Scala, etc. all have their probabilistic version. Key features are
random sampling and means to adjust distributions based on obtained
information from measurements and system observations. We show some
semantic intricacies, argue that termination is more involved than the
halting problem, and discuss recursion as well as run-time analysis.

Kuldeep S. Meel

Constrained counting and sampling are two fundamental problems in Computer Science with numerous applications, including network reliability, privacy, probabilistic reasoning, and constrained-random verification. In constrained counting, the task is to compute the total weight, subject to a given weighting function, of the set of solutions of the given constraints . In constrained sampling, the task is to sample randomly, subject to a given weighting function, from the set of solutions to a set of given constraints. 

In this talk, I will introduce a novel algorithmic framework for constrained sampling and counting that combines the classical algorithmic technique of universal hashing with the dramatic progress made in Boolean reasoning over the past two decades.  This has allowed us to obtain breakthrough results in constrained sampling and counting, providing a new algorithmic toolbox in machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, privacy, and design verification .  I will demonstrate the utility of the above techniques on various real applications including probabilistic inference, design verification and our ongoing collaboration  in estimating the reliability of critical infrastructure networks during natural disasters. 

Bio:

Kuldeep Meel is a final year PhD candidate in Rice University working with Prof. Moshe Vardi and Prof. Supratik Chakraborty. His research broadly lies at the intersection of artificial intelligence and formal methods. He is the recipient of a 2016-17 IBM PhD Fellowship, the 2016-17 Lodieska Stockbridge Vaughn Fellowship and the 2013-14 Andrew Ladd Fellowship. His research won the best student paper award at the International Conference on Constraint Programming 2015. He obtained a B.Tech. from IIT Bombay and an M.S. from Rice in 2012 and 2014 respectively.  He co-won the 2014 Vienna Center of Logic and Algorithms International Outstanding Masters thesis award.